Sunday, March 10, 2019

Comics Lust 3/9/2019

Welcome back, Donist World Denizens! For those of you new to our site, I’m Donist, and I am joined by Donist World CFO the Reverse Obie* (my friends’ Boston terrier whose fur recently swapped colors) and by our marketing director/administrative assistant/Carol Corp cadet Tulip. Yeah, I’m pretty late posting and almost didn’t have time to post anything this weekend, but my puppy executive team convinced me to pull myself together and get to writing. That said, the intro this week is short and sweet, so let’s get crackin’. Anyhow, prepare yourself for the awesomeness that is Captain Marvel, be kind to each other, mind your health and sanity, treat your friends to some tacos, keep your pets safe, cherish the ones you love, hydrate, and read some great comics. Thank you for reading!


*Obie, through his dabbling in arcane magiks mixed with ancient corrupt business practices, has had not just the colors of his fur switched, but a complete overhaul of his work ethic as well…I think I’m kinda okay with the mishap.


Not sure what “Comics Lust” is about? Take a look at the Introduction to “Comics Lust” post or take a look at the static “Comics Lust Table of Contents” page to jump to a topic.

Comics Lust

Ladies Night (Part 1)



It’s Women’s History Month and after seeing the positively fantastic Captain Marvel just two days ago, it’s high time we did some rapid-fire hits on some of the best superhero comics where women take the lead.


Captain Marvel

(Written by Kelly Sue DeConnick, illustrated by Dexter Soy, originally published in 2012 by Marvel Comics)
If you are as pumped by the movie as I am, then look no further than this series by DeConnick that took a character with a backstory that was convoluted (to say the least), with a fluctuating power set that was difficult to keep straight, some interesting past costume choices (I like the Binary look), and reimagined the character by giving her a functional, non-ass-hanging-out costume (I believe designed by Jamie McKelvie), a more clearly defined and impressive set of powers, a more streamlined backstory, an actual personality, and gave us a character men and women, boys and girls could all respect and admire. The decision to have Carol Danvers take up the name of a great cosmic hero after his death in the early ‘80s is the cherry on top to this new and exciting Captain Marvel. You can start it all with the first few trades.


Ms. Marvel

(Written by G. Willow Wilson, illustrated by Adrian Alphona, originally published in 2014 by Marvel Comics)
With the original Ms. Marvel stepping up as the new Captain Marvel, there was a vacancy for the title of Ms. Marvel, and that is where Kamala Khan comes in. When a Muslim, Pakistani teenage girl is exposed to the Terrigen Mists—It’s an “Inhumans” thing…just go with it—she is granted incredible powers and sees an opportunity to do good in the world, just like her hero Carol Danvers. This series has won numerous awards and is a fun, inspiring story of a girl trying to navigate the worlds of superheroism, high school, family, expectations, and religion. It is simply delightful. You can dive in with the soon-to-be ten readily available trades.


Wonder Woman

Wonder Woman has been around for quite a while; since 1941, to be exact. So, it’s fair to say that the Princess of Power, Diana Prince, has had her ups and downs over her years in the DC Universe, so let’s spotlight a few creators who definitely got it right.

  • Wonder Woman by George Perez (Everythinged by George Perez with other illustrators later in the series, originally published in 1987) Powerful, intelligent, beautiful, and surprisingly positive during a time when superhero comics were predominantly leaning towards the dark and gritty, Perez’s Wonder Woman is a bright and shining light with captivating story arcs and stunning art. Probably the best way to read this run is through the three Omnibus editions, with the last one containing the War of the Gods event…which I really need to read someday soon.
  • Wonder Woman by Greg Rucka (Written by Greg Rucka, illustrated by many, originally published in 2003 by DC Comics) Rucka is known in the comic book world for his ability to create strong female characters, but in reality, he’s just a damn-fine writer able to tackle most any hero thrown his way…that said, this run is spectacular. Diana Prince is a diplomat from Themyscira who fights evil and inspires those around her. Your best bet is to get the two recently released collections with the first including Rucka’s OGN Wonder Woman: The Hiketeia. Heck, Rucka even returned to the character in 2016 with artist Liam Sharp and Nicola Scott as part of the “Rebirth” reboot of the entire DCU; the two deluxe editions for this later run are definitely the way to go.
  • Wonder Woman by Gail Simone (Written by Gail Simone, illustrated by many, originally published in 2008) Admittedly, this is a run I have not yet read, but I eagerly anticipate correcting that error in my judgment as I have heard it is great. It is unfortunately out of print, but you can find it digitally. Her run ran from issues #14–44 of the 2008 third series.

Speaking of Gail Simone…


Birds of Prey

(Written by Gail Simone, illustrated by many, originally published in 2003 by DC Comics)
I am exceedingly past due for a reread of Gail Simone’s epic Birds of Prey run. Oracle (formerly Batgirl), Black Canary, and Huntress are brought together to stop an evil threat and decide to continue working together despite their many differences. Throughout Simone’s run—issues #56–90, 92–108—additional characters come in and out of the series including Lady Blackhawk, Big Barda, and many others. But regardless of who was on the team, each was a force to reckoned with in their own right but together they were unstoppable. Now, the bad news…it appears that all of Simone’s trades are out of print which is kind of odd, but I don’t think you’ll have to wait long for new collected editions as a Birds of Prey movie is slated for release in 2020. Simone did return to the title in 2012 with the New 52, but even those trades are out of print, which means you’ll need to scramble for the issues or buy digitally for the time being.


That’s it for this installment. Now, get out there and see Captain Marvel, you’ll be glad you did.



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Sunday, March 3, 2019

Comics Lust 3/02/2019

Welcome back, Donist World Denizens! For those of you new to our site, I’m Donist, and I am joined by Donist World CFO the Reverse Obie* (my friends’ Boston terrier whose fur recently swapped colors) and by our marketing director/administrative assistant/Carol Corp doggie Tulip. The puppy executive team and I have spent a few extra hours at the Donist World corporate office (Mom’s basement) this past week in preparation to close this Friday. We’ll have a couple beers and some great food before seeing a certain high-profile movie we’ve been eagerly anticipating; I just need to figure out how to sneak them in somehow. We can’t wait! Anyhow, prepare yourself for the awesomeness that will be Captain Marvel, be kind to each other, mind your health and sanity, treat your friends to some tacos, keep your pets safe, cherish the ones you love, hydrate, and read some great comics. Thank you for reading!


*Obie, through his dabbling in arcane magiks mixed with ancient corrupt business practices, has had not just the colors of his fur switched, but a complete overhaul of his work ethic as well…I think I’m kinda okay with the mishap.


Not sure what “Comics Lust” is about? Take a look at the Introduction to “Comics Lust” post or take a look at the static “Comics Lust Table of Contents” page to jump to a topic.

Comics Lust

Team Me Up, Donnie! Non-Big-Two Superhero Team Comics (Part 2)



When you say the words “Superhero Team,” people automatically think of The Avengers, The Justice League, The X-Men, and The Teen Titans. Those more fully steeped in the comic book world might mention the lesser known Legion of Super-Heroes, The New Mutants, The Doom Patrol, or others. The common factor amongst all of these superhero teams—aside from some freaking amazing runs, of course—is that they are all from the Big Two. But outside of the Marvel and DC comics world are some truly spectacular comics from smaller publishers that definitely warrant some much-deserved love.


Planetary

(Written by Warren Ellis, illustrated by John Cassaday, colored by Laura Martin, originally published in 1999 by Wildstorm Comics)
27 comics spread over 10 years…yeah, it was a brutal wait between issues but this Donist World Darling is so damn good it will forever sit firmly in my top 10 comics of all time. With this tremendous series, you get a complete story centered around three individuals who don’t look like your stereotypical superhero, but their unique abilities set them amongst the most powerful of the capes-and-tights crowd. New member Elijah Snow (very spry for a guy well over 100 years old, controls cold and ice), Jakita Wagner (nigh-invulnerable, superhuman strength, desperate to never feel bored), and The Drummer (not quite right in the ol’ brainpan, but can detect and read all forms of information whether that means electric, spiritual, or magical) are the three leading members of the group known as Planetary; there was once another member named Ambrose Chase, but Jakita and The Drummer will not talk about what happened to him…at least not yet (you’ll have to read the book to discover his fate!). Planetary sees themselves as archaeologists of the unknown and are dedicated to discovering the world’s secret history. Unfortunately, an evil group known as The Four (yup, Fantastic Four analogues) stands in direct opposition to Planetary and they seek to gather the mysteries of the world for themselves and always seem to be a few steps ahead.
Ellis brilliantly weaves in alternate versions of pop culture icons throughout the series like Godzilla, Tarzan, Captain Marvel (Shazam!), Nick Fury, Vertigo Comics characters, among others while Cassaday provides his career-defining work with beautiful colors by Martin who kept the series bright and vibrant in contrast to other popular works of the time. The best way to read this MUST READ series is through the two trade collections which include some extra one-shots, including the thrilling Planetary/Batman: Night on Earth that fans of the main series absolutely should not skip.
*note: Back in the day, I originally thought the series ended with #26, which left me with a rather unsatisfied feeling, but three years later, issue #27 arrived and completely delivered one of the most satisfying endings to a series I have ever read. I still get teary-eyed every time I get to those last few pages. Such a triumph of a comic!

Top 10

(Written by Alan Moore, illustrated by Gene Ha and Zander Cannon, originally published in 1999 by America’s Best Comics)
In a world where nearly everyone has superpowers, it stands to reason that the police have superpowered individuals on the force as well. Top 10 follows the cops of Precinct 10 as they seek to bring down serial killers, deadly gangs, and even an invisible ass-grabber. Moore—yes, THAT Alan Moore—creates a rich world with an impressive roster of characters with cool/bizarre abilities brought to astonishing life by Ha. I especially like Smax (a towering, surly, indigo-skinned, silver-haired tough guy), Girl One (a superhumanly quick and agile woman whose skin boasts constantly shifting patterns and colors), and Sergeant Caesar (a highly intelligent Doberman pinscher that walks around in a bipedal, humanoid exoskeleton) are my current favorites in the series thus far. Oh, yeah, I should mention that I finally just got around to reading this series and I’m loving every page of it thus far. Your best bet is to pick up the done-in-one collection…if you can find it.


Rising Stars

(Written by J. Michael Straczynski and later Fiona Avery; illustrated by a bunch of people including Keu Cha, Stuart Immonen, Gary Frank, and others; originally published in 1999 by Top Cow Comics)
Okay, to avoid trudging through the quagmire of Rising Stars material out there, I’m going to direct you to the Rising Stars Compendium which contains the following books: Rising Stars #0, ½, 1–24, Prelude, the short story “Initiations,” Rising Stars: Bright #1–3, Rising Stars: Voices of the Dead #1–6, and Rising Stars: Untouchable #1–5. I am definitely due for a reread of this series as I don’t fully remember much about it other than loving it at the time. What I can say is that after a fireball crashed in Pederson, Illinois, 113 children were later born with incredible powers. As they grew into adults, some sought to help the world while others looked to exploit it; they would come to learn their powers came for a grander purpose. Yup, I’m eager to immerse myself back in this world and experience the thrill of this series all over again.


Secret Weapons

(Written by Eric Heisserer, illustrated by Raul Allen and Patricia Martin, originally published in 2017 by Valiant Comics)
This one took me completely by surprise when I first read and fell in love with this short but compelling-as-heck miniseries and it too is calling out for a reread. The technopath known as Livewire seeks to gather four superhumans whose powers are considered by many to be “worthless,” but where others see a bunch of nobodies, Livewire sees great potential for good. Unfortunately, she needs to act fast as a mechanized serial killer is out murdering those with minor powers. Yeah, I was blown away by Secret Weapons #1–4 and you are in for a treat if you haven’t taken a quick dip in this nerve-wracking adventure. Luckily for you, there is a readily available trade, and lucky for me there are two additional issues that are not in the trade that I just learned about: Secret Weapons #0 (a prequel) and Secret Weapons: Owen’s Story #0 (following the adventures of Owen Cho who has the ability to summon things out of thin air…only he never knows what it is he might summon!). I know precious little about the current Valiant Universe and although Livewire seems to have a rich history around her you can jump right into the thick things and get along just fine.


That’s it for this installment, Denizens, have a great weekend and I hope you can make it to the theater this coming Friday to catch some Captain Marvel glory.



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Saturday, February 23, 2019

Comics Lust 2/23/2019

Welcome back, Donist World Denizens! For those of you new to our site, I’m Donist, and I am joined by Donist World CFO the Reverse Obie* (my friends’ Boston terrier whose fur recently swapped colors) and by our marketing director/administrative assistant/beer Betty Tulip. Keeping this one way short as the puppy executive team and I are taking a break from working on the weekend and heading out for some Corazón Cocina tacos and a beer or two at The Garden. After that, we’ll probably come home and read some more Alien Encounters issues of old. Anyhow, be kind to each other, mind your health and sanity, treat your friends to some tacos, keep your pets safe, cherish the ones you love, hydrate, and read some great comics. Thank you for reading!


*Obie, through his dabbling in arcane magiks mixed with ancient corrupt business practices, has had not just the colors of his fur switched, but a complete overhaul of his work ethic as well…I think I’m kinda okay with the mishap.


Not sure what “Comics Lust” is about? Take a look at the Introduction to “Comics Lust” post or take a look at the static “Comics Lust Table of Contents” page to jump to a topic.

Comics Lust

Chocolate and Peanut Butter: Cross-Company Crossovers (Part 4)



Right before the great comic book implosion of the ’90s, I quit buying comics for a handful of years. I had grown tired of the gimmick covers, the trading cards, the poly bags, the eternally delayed titles, the rising prices, the events that went on and on, and the irritating focus on comics being “extreme” over delivering a solid story with great art. Yeah, I threw in the towel. Thankfully that changed.

I don’t even remember what compelled me to walk into my old LCS a few years later, but after sifting through their bargain bins I came across something that grabbed my attention: the cross-company crossover Pinhead vs. Marshal Law. That did it. I was pulled back in and I’ve been reading comics ever since.

One thing I did not realize during the ’90s was that cross-company crossovers were happening left and right. Everyone was everywhere and apparently with little concern for such things as reprinting rights…hence the difficulty in being able to readily find many of these comics outside of the back issue bins. Today, we continue our journey by looking at some more Big Two superheroes (see “Part 1” for previously covered Big Two crossovers) who jumped across legal boundaries to thrill readers and forever cause strife for the poor legal and accounting departments struggling to determine who owns what, how much all parties get paid, and who decides what gets reprinted and when. I will warn that I haven’t read a single one of these, so no accounting for quality, and I have no idea how big of a rabbit hole I’m about to go down, but let’s see what we can unearth.


Batman/Punisher: Lake of Fire

(Written by Dennis O’Neill, illustrated by Barry Kitson and James Pascoe, originally published in 1994 by DC Comics)
It’s the armored version of the Dark Knight, Azrael, versus the Punisher in a prestige format package. There will be punching and kicking and guns and cutting and all sorts of evil doings. If someone gets a boot to the head in this issue, then I would say tracking it down is worth your effort.


Punisher/Batman: Deadly Knights

(Written by Chuck Dixon, illustrated by John Romita Jr and Klaus Janson, originally published in 1994 by Marvel Comics)
A few months after Batman/Punisher: Lake of Fire, Marvel released this follow up where Batman (the Bruce Wayne flavor) teams with the Punisher to stop Jigsaw and the Joker from bringing about murderous mayhem and mischief.


Green Lantern/Silver Surfer: Unholy Alliances

(Written by Ron Marz, illustrated by Darryl Banks and Terry Austin, originally published in 1995 by DC/Marvel)
What?! Now, THIS has my interest sparked. Green Lantern squares off against Terrax?! The Silver Surfer fights the Cyborg Superman?! And then the two must team up to stop Thanos and Parallax from doing whatever it is they are doing?! I am sooooo onboard for this comic. It also serves as a prelude to the DC vs. Marvel miniseries I mentioned back in “Part 1.” Dammit. Now I really need to track all of these down.


Spider-Man and Batman: Disordered Minds

(Written J.M. DeMatteis, illustrated by Mark Bagley and Scott Hanna and Mark Farmer, originally published in 1995 by Marvel/DC)
Batman and Spider-Man team up—probably after an obligatory fight scene—to stop Carnage and the Joker from some sort of diabolical nonsense. But, hey, DeMatteis wrote it, so I’m definitely interested. This was released as a squared bond comic with an embossed cover (marketing shenanigans), which probably accounted for the $5.95 cover price.


Silver Surfer/Superman

(Written by George Perez, illustrated by Ron Lim and Terry Austin, originally published in 1996 by Marvel/DC)
Again, this is the first I’m hearing of this comic and given the talent involved I definitely want to read it. The cover tells me nothing about what goes on within the 48 pages, but anytime you have Lim on the Surfer, you’ll find me smiling and eager to check the book out.


Batman and Captain America

(Everythinged by John Byrne, originally published in 1996 by DC/Marvel)
Batman and Captain America team up during World War II to punch Nazis and restore order to the free world. Sweet. I don’t know if any of their respective villains show up in this or not, but you honestly don’t need them.


Daredevil and Batman: Eye for an Eye

(Written by D.G. Chichester, illustrated by Scott McDaniel, originally published in 1997 by Marvel/DC)
Hmmmm...not finding a whole lot about this one other than the two crime fighters attempt to stop Two-Face and Mr. Hyde. What I wish we got to see was a ’80s Batman and Daredevil one-shot by Frank Miller; now that woulda been somethin’.


Batman and Spider-Man: New Age Dawning

(Written by J.M. DeMatteis, illustrated by Graham Nolan and Karl Kesel, originally published in 1997 by DC/Marvel)
Ra’s al Ghul makes the Kingpin an offer he can't refuse: if he wishes for his beloved Vanessa to survive her illness, the Kingpin must kill off most of the world’s population. It’s up to Batman and Spider-Man to stop them. A 48-page follow-up to 1995’s crossover.


The Incredible Hulk vs Superman

(Written by Roger Stern, illustrated by Steve Rude and Al Milgrom, originally published in 1999 by Marvel/DC)
Okay, the cover alone had me, but a fateful meeting of each company’s respective powerhouse as illustrated by Steve Rude?! Yeah, this one looks to be pretty fun. I wish I had caught it as it was being released.


Superman/Fantastic Four: The Infinite Destruction

(Written by Dan Jurgens, illustrated by Dan Jurgens and Art Thibert, originally published in 1999 by DC/Marvel)
Marvel’s First Family teams up with the Man of Steel to stop Galactus?! In an oversized treasury edition comic?! That makes this 10” x 13”, 64-page beauty something I would very much like to experience for myself.


Batman/Daredevil: King of New York

(Written by Alan Grant, illustrated by Eduardo Barreto, originally published in 2000 by DC/Marvel)
Batman and Daredevil must team up with none other than the Kingpin after the crime lord is double-crossed by the Scarecrow who looks to subject New York to unending fear. A 48-page one-shot, this prestige format comic is one that sparked my interest despite it being on the more difficult to find and pricey side of things.


Apologies, Denizens. If this is your first time hearing about some of these series and you got excited for some of them, I regret to inform you that tracking them down is not going to be easy or cheap, but hopefully, Marvel/DC will one day reissue the following four trades:


Hmmm...it looks like Batman/Daredevil: King of New York is left out in the cold with no collection to call home, which is a bummer because it actually sounds quite good. For me, though, I’ll be looking for the fourth volume so I can get some cosmic goodness. See you next time.



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Saturday, February 16, 2019

Comics Lust 2/16/2019

Welcome back, Donist World Denizens! For those of you new to our site, I’m Donist, and I am joined by Donist World CFO the Reverse Obie* (my friends’ Boston terrier whose fur recently swapped colors) and by our marketing director/administrative assistant/my valentine. Alrighty, the 30-Day Real Food challenge is over and I have had tacos with chips at Corazón Cocina and beer at the Garden; all is right in the world once again. Now that things are back in order and my puppy executive team and I are back to business as usual and armed with better dietary knowledge, we can commence maintaining our status as a Fortune 320,000 company…after a quick nap. Anyhow, be kind to each other, mind your health and sanity, treat your friends to some tacos, keep your pets safe, cherish the ones you love, hydrate, and read some great comics. Thank you for reading!


*Obie, through his dabbling in arcane magiks mixed with ancient corrupt business practices, has had not just the colors of his fur switched, but a complete overhaul of his work ethic as well…I think I’m kinda okay with the mishap.


Not sure what “Comics Lust” is about? Take a look at the Introduction to “Comics Lust” post or take a look at the static “Comics Lust Table of Contents” page to jump to a topic.

Comics Lust

Chocolate and Peanut Butter: Cross-Company Crossovers (Part 3)



I have no idea what I’m about to get myself into, but for this installment, I want to look at cross-company crossovers that mostly focus on the Dark Knight himself, Batman. I’m aware that this will probably need to be a multiparter within a multiparter as everyone who’s anyone has teamed with The Bat at some time or another. We’ll see how it goes. We’ll start with some of my favorites as well as others that touch on some well-known darlings from the ’80s: aliens, and predators, and terminators, oh my!


Batman Grendel #1–2

(Everythinged by Matt Wagner, originally published in 1993 by DC Comics and Dark Horse)
Oh, man, it has been far too long since I read this awesome crossover. Everyone knows my deep love of Wagner’s Grendel comics (and Mage, as well), so when you have the creator of the infamous crime boss Grendel training his electrified fork upon Gotham’s dark knight, there was no way I could let this one slip by. Here you have billionaire playboys Hunter Rose and Bruce Wayne meeting for the first time as their alter egos clash at night in some truly spectacular fight sequences mixed with noir intrigue. Fans of either character—or both, like me—simply must read this miniseries, especially before diving into the follow-up…


Batman Grendel II #1–2

(Everythinged by Matt Wagner, originally published in 1996 by DC Comics and Dark Horse)
Batman squares off against Grendel once again, only this is a different incarnation known as Grendel Prime, an unstoppable and ruthless killer determined to locate the skull of Hunter Rose. Gorgeous Art Deco style art by Wagner and a compelling as hell story have me chomping at the bit to dive back in. A trade collecting both parts exists, but it unfortunately looks to be out of print. Whether you read in issues or trade, just be sure you get yourself caught up.


Batman Hellboy Starman #1–2

(Written by James Robinson, illustrated by Mike Mignola, originally published in 1999 by DC Comics and Darkhorse)
This one completely snuck past me way back when which is shocking as I love Robinson’s Starman series. Jack and Ted Knight, Batman and Hellboy have to combine sorcery with science to stop a bunch Nazi scum from summoning an evil elder god? Heck. Yeah. So much fun! The only way to get these two issues collected is by finding either the Hellboy: Masks and Monsters collection or the Starman Omnibus Volume 4 or the DC Comics/Dark Horse Comics: Justice League Volume 1 (more on this one later).


Batman and Judge Dredd

I had always been aware of Judge Dredd and the 2000 AD publisher, especially during the ’80s, it’s just that my allowance was limited and there were a ton of other comics vying for my dollars. Then, in 1991, Batman had a one-shot that caught my attention as did a string of other books that followed:


Now, admittedly, I’ve only read the first half of these fine books, but thankfully there is a readily available trade called Batman/Judge Dredd Collection that includes all four of the above, with the bonus Lobo/Judge Dredd: Psycho Biker (written by John Wagner and Alan Grant, illustrated by Val Semeiks and John Dell, originally published in 1995 by DC Comics) included. Looks like I’ll be picking up this collection in the near future.


Aliens, Predators, and Terminators Meet DC

Okay, these are all uncharted waters for this here Donist, which is why I decided to take a closer look in the first place. Time to add to my own reading list, let’s see what we find:

  • Batman Versus Predator #1–3 (Written by Dave Gibbons, illustrated by Andy Kubert and Adam Kubert, originally published in 1992 by DC Comics and Dark Horse)
  • Batman Versus Predator II: Bloodmatch #1–4 (Written by Doug Moench, illustrated by Paul Gulacy and Terry Austin, originally published in 1994 by DC Comics and Dark Horse)
  • Superman Aliens #1–3 (Written by Dan Jurgens, illustrated by Dan Jurgens and Kevin Nowlan, originally published in 1995 by DC Comics and Dark Horse) This looks pretty dang cool to me!
  • Batman Versus Predator III: Blood Ties #1–4 (Written by Chuck Dixon, illustrated by Rodolfo Damaggio and Robert Campanella, originally published in 1997 by DC Comics and Dark Horse)
  • Batman Aliens #1–2 (Written by Ron Marz, illustrated by Bernie Wrightson, originally published in 1997 by DC Comics and Dark Horse). Wrightson on art?!?! How the hell did I miss this?!
  • Superman Versus the Terminator: Fight for the Future #1–4 (Written by Alan Grant, illustrated by Steve Pugh, originally published in 1999 by DC Comics and Dark Horse) Okay, given the creators, I totally want to check this out.
  • Superman vs. Predator #1–3 (Written by David Michelinie, illustrated by Alex Maleev, originally published in 2000 by DC Comics and Dark Horse)
  • Green Lantern Versus Aliens #1–4 (Written by Ron Marz, illustrated by Rick Leonardi and Mike Perkins, originally published in 2000 by DC Comics and Dark Horse) Yeah, I really want to check this one out!

Wow. This was a more extensive list than I initially thought it would be, but the good thing is that there are certain to be some real gems in there and they all look to be quite fun. Now, reading them in collected formats appears to be somewhat difficult in that each series has its own trade, but luckily you can read them all—with some extras—in these five collections:


Holy cow, I have a bunch of stuff to track down so I can get my read on! See you next week.



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